You were excited to move into a new home until you completed the sale and finally got there. While everything looked good on the outside, you started to notice little issues as you walked around the home. First, you felt like the patio wasn’t leveled. Then, you noticed that the roof looked a little droopy. 

When you had an inspection, no one had mentioned anything about the roof’s condition or that there was a problem with leveling any part of the home. As you continued to walk the home, you tried to plug in a device and it sparked. That was unusual, but not as much as the gaping hole under your sink’s cabinet. There was a significant water leak. 

All of these things should have been discovered on your inspection or disclosed by the seller. They were fairly obvious problems once you started living in the home, but they could have easily been missed when you were just quickly touring the property. 

It is a seller’s responsibility to disclose all material defects in a property. They should list out all of the problems, big or small. If you find a material defect that was not disclosed after you make a purchase, you may still be able to cancel the transaction. 

If you had an inspection, keep in mind that the inspector may also be liable for at least the cost of the inspection. This is because the individual missed obvious defects that they should have identified right away. 

If you are concerned about a purchase you made and defects you’re finding now, it’s a good idea to learn more about the state’s laws and your options. You may not have to remain in the home and may have the option of canceling the transaction.

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