Contract disputes rage on between DirecTV and Hearst Television

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Contract disputes rage on between DirecTV and Hearst Television

DirecTV subscribers in Illinois may be among others across the nation who are feeling frustrated when they try to watch their favorite television programs and discover the stations have been blocked. Contract disputes between DirecTV and Hearst Television are apparently the cause of the stations being pulled. Some say there is no likely end in sight to the current dispute.

As is often the case in such situations, both sides believe their positions are justifiable. DirecTV says many of the stations Hearst has pulled from its line-up are accessible for free online and through other satellite means. For this reason, it finds Hearst’s request for increased fees unfair.

Hearst has an entirely different opinion, however. The company says it has invested substantial funds to provide high quality viewing for consumers, and DirecTV’s request for the right to carry its stations at below market prices is unreasonable. DirecTV has told its subscribers to remain patient while an agreeable solution to the problem is negotiated.

If any or all parties engaged in contract disputes refuse to compromise, it can lead to a stalemate in negotiations. Often, solutions seem impossible to reach without skilled representation. A business and commercial law attorney is prepared to assist anyone in Illinois facing similar contract problems. A favorable outcome often hinges on aggressive litigation, and an experienced attorney has insight into what type of strategy may be best in a particular situation. Any businessperson with questions or concerns about a current contract issue may contact a business and commercial law office to request a consultation.

Source: dominionpost.com, “DIRECTV, WTAE in contract dispute“, Jan. 3, 2017

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