McCarthy & Allen Madison County Attorneys
We offer flexible appointment hours.

Local: 618-307-4099

Toll Free: 888-847-9322

Illinois teachers may relate to contract negotiation problems

How important are words? If the question were specific to contractual agreements, then the answer would be that they are extremely important. In fact, a single word in a contract can sometimes change the entire meaning of an agreement. A group of teachers in a state outside Illinois appear to grasp this concept because they are fighting for specific language pertaining to employee transfers (among other things) in their current contract negotiation.

The negotiation process has been placed on hold for now between a group of teachers that serves at least 13,000 students and their administrators. The school board initially set forth more than 240 new proposals during negotiations, but representatives for the teachers say they've narrowed that number down to between 20 to 30 issues. The teachers want changes regarding their pay, benefits, time clocks and terminology used in reference to employee transfers in their contract. 

Where pay is concerned, it seems starting pay is not as much of a problem as the fact that 10 years into their teaching careers in this particular district, they make at least $5,000 less than their counterparts in surrounding regions. The teachers current contract expires at the end of June. Many are concerned as to whether contract problems will be resolved in time for the 2017/2018 school year, which begins in mid-August.

A business and commercial law attorney is often highly skilled at contract negotiation. Illinois teachers, private residents and/or business people facing contract-related problems can enlist the assistance of an experienced business attorney to fight their battles for them. This type of representation is often a key factor in obtaining swift, fair and economically feasible results.

Source: mydaytondailynews.com, "Dayton teacher contract dispute: What's really going on?", Grant Pepper, Jeremy P. Kelley, June 7, 2017

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information